Wellness in the Workplace

January 16, 2018

By Christy Fox, Marketing

With the new year, and new resolutions, gyms are packed with people focusing on improving their health and overall well-being. Not only are individuals working towards goals of a healthier lifestyle; employers have been investing in and developing wellness programs for the workplace as well. Wellness programs in the workplace are proven to improve productivity, culture, and employee satisfaction with their jobs in addition to saving the company money on healthcare costs. There are a variety of ways for companies, both large and small, to improve employee wellness from fitness initiatives, to healthy eating, to mental health. Here are some ideas for companies to promote wellness in their organization (both free and paid).

  • Work with local gyms to get corporate discounts on memberships to offer employees, or provide a gym membership reimbursement plan as an incentive to working out. According to the PricewaterhouseCoopers 2016 Health and Well-Being Touchstone Survey, 73% of employers offer physical activity programs/fitness discounts.
  • Encourage walking meetings or offer standing desks.
  • Provide healthy snacks or fruit in a common area of the office.
  • Organize company group fitness classes.
  • Bring in professionals to go over mental health topics such as stress management, healthy sleep habits, meditation, and more.
  • Provide a list of healthy food options nearby the office for employees who may otherwise be unaware of the options surrounding them.
  • Offer one on one coaching or personal training.
  • Invest in health measurements such as biometric screening, BMI measurements, and health risk questionnaires.
  • Provide tobacco cessation programs.
  • Hold fitness or healthy eating challenges or competitions.

Encouraging health and wellness in the workplace will overall attract talent, create a great place to work, and offer employees the tools they need to live a healthier lifestyle. What types of health and wellness initiatives are most important to you in the workplace?

How to Grab the Attention of Hiring Managers and Recruiters

January 2, 2018

By Barb Miller, Marketing Manager

If you’re seeking a job, standing out and capturing the attention of hiring managers and recruiters can be a challenge. This means that you have to cut through all the noise out there, online and offline, in order to make yourself easy to find.

Here are a few suggestions:

Upload your resume to job boards. Hiring managers and recruiters often rely upon sites such as Career Builder, Monster, and Indeed to find candidates who aren’t in their internal applicant tracking system. These job boards are a gold mine for trying to find the perfect candidate for a role. Large career sites such as Career Builder will ask you upload your resume into their database at no charge. Resumes stored into their database are then available to hiring managers and recruiters who pay for access to search their bank of resumes.

Keep your resume up-to-date. Make sure you update your resume every few months and make it stand out. Tailor your resume to your desired job title you’re seeking and show how you’re different. For example, every time you have an achievement or are recognized by your company or industry, brag about it. This is not the time to be humble. You need to showcase the stuff that hiring managers and recruiters are looking for.

Develop online presence at beBee.com. beBee is a new personal branding platform. The network was created to allow people to showcase and share their personal brand and market themselves to employers, clients, customers, vendors and media in their respective industries. beBee allows users to network with each other through common personal and professional interests, uniting their personal and professional lives in one place.

Beef up LinkedIn profile. It’s no longer enough to just build a LinkedIn profile. You need to include the most relevant keywords used in your industry, highlight your skill sets, keep your accomplishments up-to-date, quantify achievements whenever possible, such as “increased productivity by 25%” or “doubled sales quota” and make sure your personal settings are allowing hiring managers and recruiters to view your profile. Double check by clicking on Settings, then click the Privacy header, you’ll see a Job Seeking section. Set it to the mode that allows hiring managers and recruiters to know that you’re open to opportunities.

Add Google+ to social media efforts. In addition to your LinkedIn, Facebook & Twitter profiles, add Google’s social media channel, Google+. It’s definitely worth exploring. Google+ offers great chances for professionals to showcase their work through online portfolios. Check out the Google+ communities and you’ll discover a number of Google+ users are from various industries and job levels. Remember to keep your profile updated in Google+ including your current location so hiring managers and recruiters can easily find you.

Be seen in the right places. Never miss an opportunity to connect with key influencers and leaders in your field. Networking at industry events is the perfect environment to approach these people and have a discussion. Too often people shy away from the trade show exhibit hall at conferences. They fear that they will have to talk to salespeople, but these industry suppliers are some of the best people for you to get to know and learn more about the current business climate. Approximately 85% of jobs are filled through networking.

Volunteer in the community. To fill time between jobs or explore new opportunities and careers, many people are finding that a volunteer job especially in the nonprofit sector can sometimes lead to permanent, salaried employment. For example, each October, there’s the “Make a Difference Day,” one of the largest annual single-days of service nationwide. People from all walks of life, professions and industries come together with a single purpose…to improve the lives of others. On a day like this, you never know who you could meet or work alongside.

If you are in the job market, let us know what other ways you’re using to grab the attention of hiring managers and recruiters. Please post below.

Salary History: What you can & can’t ask based on recent changes in laws across the country

November 14, 2017

Throughout the recruiting process, there are countless questions aimed towards finding out whether job candidates will be a fit for the company. A common topic recruiters and employers bring up when vetting jobseekers is salary. While this may have been the norm in the past, asking about previous pay history is now banned in certain locations. The reasoning for this ban is to make efforts to close the pay gap between men and women, and to encourage basing pay upon skills and qualifications instead of previous salary, according to NYC Commission on Human Rights A recent Hunt Scanlon article covered how bans on compensation history questions could change the way recruiting firms do business, and how employers recruit talent. Here is what you need to know as a recruiter, employer, or jobseeker about salary history questions where the laws are in effect.

What you CAN’T do under the new laws:

  • You can’t ask a prospective candidate what they are currently earning at a job.
  • You can’t use the candidate’s previous pay to determine an offer if you stumble across it on accident.

What you CAN do:

  • If the candidate offers salary history without prompting and voluntarily, it can be considered.
  • You can ask about a candidate’s salary expectations, as opposed to what they made prior.

What happens if you break the rules:

Where you are restricted from asking about salary, based on a recent article by Business Insider:

  • California
    • The ban covers private and public employers from asking a candidate’s pay history, set to take effect in January 2018.
  • Delaware
    • All employers are banned, taking effect in December 2017.
  • Massachusetts
    • All employers are banned, taking effect in July 2018.
  • New Orleans
    • The ban is currently in effect just for city departments and employees of contractors working for the city.
  • New York City
    • Public and private employers are banned from asking pay history questions, effective now.
  • Oregon
    • The law banning all employers from salary questions goes into effect January 2019.
  • Philadelphia
    • The ban was set to take effect in May, 2017 for all employers, however, a temporary halt has been placed on it.
  • Pittsburgh
    • City agencies are banned from the inquiry, effective now.
  • Puerto Rico
    • All employers are restricted from inquiring about candidate’s pay history, going into effect March 2018

It is important for all parties involved in any recruiting process to be aware of these new and upcoming bans on salary history questions.

Direct Consulting Associates (DCA) stays current on these laws around the country. If you have any questions about this, please contact us for a conversation.

The Case for Unlimited PTO by Matthew Cohen, Energy & Sustainability and HVAC Practice Leader, DRI

October 25, 2017

By Matthew Cohen, Practice Leader - Energy & Sustainability and HVAC/R, Direct Recruiters, Inc.

As a recruiter, I routinely manage the expectations of candidates during the offer stage of their interview process. Recently, the most negotiated piece of the offers I see besides salary is paid vacation time.  For decades, the standard for vacation time in most industries was a small amount of PTO accrued over time and the additional PTO was tied to the amount of years someone was employed.  We are seeing a fundamental shift in the importance of PTO.  The advances in our understanding of mental and physical health has caused candidates to value PTO as a key factor in their decision-making process when deciding on a career change.  This shift begs the question: why not have unlimited PTO for your employees?  Below are three reasons unlimited PTO should be considered:

  1. Healthier, Happier Employees: There are a multitude of studies that show the negative effects sitting in an office can do someone both mentally and physically. Having unlimited PTO can give an employee an opportunity to decompress and recharge whenever they feel the need.  Employees who come to work with a positive attitude more often can create a better work environment and decrease stress and employee burnout which will in turn, increase employee retention.
  2. More productivity: It sounds odd, but there is a case to be made that the more PTO employees are given, the greater their productivity. If employees can come to work with less mental or physical stress, they are more likely to produce results at a higher rate. If employees are counting the months until their next few days of PTO, that distraction can limit their productivity.  In addition, having unlimited PTO can create a greater relationship between employees and employers which also can lead to an increase in productivity.
  3. Greater Accountability: One of the biproducts of allowing unlimited PTO is greater accountability between employers and employers. Employees are more likely to be more transparent and honest about their work if they have the freedom to take PTO when they need to.  Those who abuse unlimited PTO and who are not productive when back at work, can be dealt with swiftly with a shared understanding that unlimited PTO means more accountability when at work.

While not all industries and jobs can support unlimited PTO, the importance of vacation is growing at a rate where we all need to understand and take notice.  We are seeing unlimited PTO polices work in many industries and we see this as a continued trend in the future.  Next time you hear someone say, “I need a vacation” you might just want to give it to them.

Contact Matthew:
440-996-0860
mcohen@directrecruiters.com
Matthew's LinkedIn

Employee Spotlight Video: David Duggan, Account Executive at DCA

October 9, 2017

As an Account Executive at DCA, David Duggan acts as a link between DCA and clients, and actively works to connect top Healthcare IT talent to hospitals and health systems across the country. David brings extensive experience building and maintaining client relationships while continuously demonstrating DCA's Core Values. Tom Clark, VP of Operations said, "David’s experience establishing, building, and maintaining client relationships helps him bring a calming presence that is very natural and inclusive to those around him.  Our clients enjoy interacting with David, as do his teammates.  He’s done well for us and our clients in time-sensitive, high pressure situations.  David is a terrific ambassador of our Core Values.”

We recently put David into the spotlight and asked him a few questions relating to his position here at DCA. David gives a great overview on his position at DCA, the DCA core value that resonates most with him, and the keys to success at DCA and in the HIT and IT staffing industry.

Watch our Employee Spotlight video and meet David Duggan! Contact him if you are interested in speaking with him about your IT and HIT initiatives, or to have a networking conversation: dduggan@dc-associates.com or 440-991-1061.